Sunday, October 24, 2021, 19:00–20:00 ÖRGRYTE NEW CHURCH

Sunday, October 24, 2021, 19:00–20:00 ÖRGRYTE NEW CHURCH

100.00 - 150.00
CREATIVE COLLISIONS V
Music by Henrik Denerin, Paul Hindemith, Christer Lindwall, and others
In collaboration with Gageego!



Rei Munakata, conductor
Mårten Landström, piano
Øyvor Volle, Helena Frankmar, violin
Daniel Lee, viola
Johan Stern, cello
Thomas Allin, double bass
Anders Jonhäll, flute
Geoffrey Cox, oboe
Ragnar Arnberg, Kate McDermott, clarinet
Constantin Gerstein, bassoon
Lisa Ford, horn
Bengt Danielsson, trumpet
Endre Vetås, trombone
Kristian Karlstedt, tuba
Ligita Sneibe, organ
Hans Davidsson, organ
Stefan Östersjö, guitar
Jonas Larsson, Johan Bejke, percussion



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CREATIVE COLLISIONS V
Music by Henrik Denerin, Paul Hindemith, Christer Lindwall, and others
In collaboration with Gageego!

 

Rei Munakata, conductor
Mårten Landström, piano
Øyvor Volle, Helena Frankmar, violin
Daniel Lee, viola
Johan Stern, cello
Thomas Allin, double bass
Anders Jonhäll, flute
Geoffrey Cox, oboe
Ragnar Arnberg, Kate McDermott, clarinet
Constantin Gerstein, bassoon
Lisa Ford, horn
Bengt Danielsson, trumpet
Endre Vetås, trombone
Kristian Karlstedt, tuba
Ligita Sneibe, organ
Hans Davidsson, organ
Stefan Östersjö, guitar
Jonas Larsson, Johan Bejke, percussion

 

The Creative Collisions part of the festival is funded by Musikverket

 

MICHELANGELO ROSSI (1601/02–1656)
Toccata settima

 

CHRISTER LINDWALL (b. 1950)
”Sometimes standing in the void, sometimes shivering in the open”

The second in a series of pieces based on Samuel Beckett`s development of different language levels.

 

Gilles Deleuze writes in his essay ”The exhausted” about image-ritornellos that run throughout Samuel Beckett`s books.

In First Love, ”he” watches the sky as it comes and goes, and ”she” sings in a low voice. The image is not defined by the sublimity or its content but by its form, that is, by its ”internal tension”, or by the force it mobilizes to create a void or to bore holes, to loosen the grip of words, to dry upp the oozing of voices, so as to free itself from memory and reason: a small, alogical,
amnesiac, and almost aphasic image, sometimes standing in the void,
sometimes shivering in the open. The image is not an object but a ”process”.

Christer Lindwall (1950) studied composition for, among others, Jan W.
Mortenson. He has been composing both instrumental and electronic music since the early 80s, from the 2000s with a greater focus on the musical
material´s connections to language philosophy and its branches.

 

GIROLAMO FRESCOBALDI (1583–1643)
Toccata quarta per l’organo da sonarsi alla levatione
Il seccondo libro di Toccate (1637)

Intermission

 

PAUL HINDEMITH (1895–1963)
Kammermusik No. 2 op 36 No. 1 for piano and chamber orchestra

 

HENRIK DENERIN
Atmen Sie mit mir…
(Commissioned by Sveriges Radio)

 

Atmen – breath. From the onset my musical thinking has always aimed at composing out the abundance of mediations between a number of extremes, or pairs of opposites (like a single breath can be seen as the opposites of inhaling / exhaling): between sound and noise, extreme depth and highest height, durations of such length that they can hardly still be perceived, and the most fleeting moments, between greatest complexity and simplest static. Between the absolute periodicity and complete aperiodicity of rhythms, between scrupulously notated groups of notes or parts of a work and their free combination for performances, between the most detailed
through-composed sections of works and passages left to the intuition of the interpreter.

 

But breathing is also rhythm: oscillation or vibration. On the one hand, this is a term from physical acoustics. On the other hand, “vibration” also has a metaphysical connotation. (In the context of a “theology of dance”, as the theologian Hugo Rahner has deciphered it from Greek and early Christian texts in his book Man At Play, it is “the free-soaring motion [ Beschwingung ] which God as creative principle has imparted to the cosmos.)

 

If music is the interplay of proportionate vibrations which move in time and which can reoccur cyclically but always generate new forms, then it is possible to say that rhythm is the essence of music, since rhythm is the reoccurrence of a movement as time passes, is repetition of something similar, not the same. The temporal arrow intervenes in the cycle of time and stakes its claim on the new, unrepeatable. In rhythm (and breath) the periodic reoccurrence of something identical, as indicated by the beat, is modulated into aperiodicity.